Battime

This is a blog dedicated entirely to bats. New posts are added at various times.
In post-free periods feel free to explore battime!
If you have any questions or suggestions feel free to use the ask box.
None of the photos belong to me unless said otherwise.
Please do not disturb bats, they are wild animals and should be left in peace




ecosapienshow:

Our latest infographic. See the episode here!

Reblogged from ecosapienshow

ecosapienshow:

Our latest infographic. See the episode here!

Plecotus alpinus - Alpine Long-Eared Bat eating Garden tiger moth (Arctia caja)

Photo by Dietmar Nill

Plecotus alpinus - Alpine Long-Eared Bat eating Garden tiger moth (Arctia caja)

Photo by Dietmar Nill

Plecotus alpinus - Alpine Long-Eared Bat

Photos by Dietmar Nill

Ectophylla alba - Honduran White Bat

Photo by Jan Boer

Ectophylla alba - Honduran White Bat

Photo by Jan Boer

Ectophylla alba - Honduran white bat

Photo by Matt Brady

Ectophylla alba - Honduran white bat

Photo by Matt Brady

Reblogged from ecosapienshow

ecosapienshow:

New episode out today! - The amazing world of Bats.

As night descends, many species of nocturnal animal emerge. Bats are by far the most iconic and amazing. Join David as he explores amazing bat facts in this introduction to the group.

Reblogged from wildlifebiologymontana

wildlifebiologymontana:

Flapping, evening, friends, an interview on bats!

While the video has been up, seems a post has escaped me. Now you have it here as well: the interview with Ellen Whittle. She has worked all summer studying bats in Montana, looking at their use of human structures such as bridges. The findings have been great and she has been so wonderful about coming in and answering some questions.

For more on bats, please see her article here.

If you’re still curious, leave us some comments on our video and either Ellen or one of our bat-loving biologists here at the UM will help answer your question.

Reblogged from wildlifebiologymontana

wildlifebiologymontana:

How adorable! A bat maternity colony!

Female bats, ready to give birth, will form maternity colonies. Often found in trees and tree cavities, they have also been found in buildings, or in this case, bridges. There have been signs of maternity colony preferences in different bat species, but as you can see here, these guys are pretty set with their man-made set up. 

Thanks to Ellen Whittle for the footage. 

Reblogged from fuck-it-i-am-a-fucking-elf

Diphylla ecaudata - Hairy-legged vampire bat

Photo by José Gabriel Martínez Fonseca

Diphylla ecaudata - Hairy-legged vampire bat

Photo by José Gabriel Martínez Fonseca

Vampyressa thyone - Northern little yellow-eared bat

Photo by José Gabriel Martínez Fonseca

Vampyressa thyone - Northern little yellow-eared bat

Photo by José Gabriel Martínez Fonseca

Black myotis (Myotis nigricans)  vs. Riparian myotis (Myotis riparius)

Photo by José Gabriel Martínez Fonseca

Black myotis (Myotis nigricans) vs. Riparian myotis (Myotis riparius)

Photo by José Gabriel Martínez Fonseca

Ectophylla alba - Honduran white bat

Photo by José Gabriel Martínez Fonseca

Ectophylla alba - Honduran white bat

Photo by José Gabriel Martínez Fonseca

Saccopteryx leptura - Lesser Sac-winged Bat

Photo by Photo by José Gabriel Martínez Fonseca

Saccopteryx leptura - Lesser Sac-winged Bat

Photo by Photo by José Gabriel Martínez Fonseca

Platyrrhinus helleri - Heller’s broad-nosed bat

Photo by José Gabriel Martínez Fonseca

Platyrrhinus helleri - Heller’s broad-nosed bat

Photo by José Gabriel Martínez Fonseca